Banner: Active Spaces

Latino kids in underserved communities have limited options for physical activity, which is part of the reason they are more likely to be overweight or obese than their peers.

How can physical activity be part of their daily experience?

The best ways to improve access to and safe use of “active spaces”— gyms, athletic fields, parks, and playgrounds—include: adopting shared use agreements; improving neighborhood characteristics, such as repairing sidewalks, installing street lights, and improving park maintenance; creating safer routes to active spaces; and using marketing and technology to change Latino kids’ physical activity patterns.

Download Our New 2016 Active Spaces Research Review, Issue Brief, and Infographics!

Research Review
Infographic: Safe Neighborhoods
Infographic: Safe Streets
Infographic: Shared Use

Active Spaces: What‘s New?

See SA! Changes SA! Resources Salud Heroes in this topic.

SA! Change 2 New Partners in Safety: Safe Routes to School and Vision Zero

Latino health physical activity traffic safety walkability vision zero

United States

Although walking has numerous mental and physical benefits-and is fun-many people avoid walking if the streets aren’t safe, which limits their mobility and access to basic necessities like schools, work, grocery stores, parks, healthcare, and other cultural and historical community resources. When it comes to safe streets, the U.S. lags far behind other countries.  Given … Read more

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SA! Resource New White Paper on Health, Behavioral Design, and the Built Environment

Latino health physical activity behavioral design

Food and physical activity are both continuous and cumulative habits. Small changes every day can drastically improve your health and quality of life. However, the built world, whether intentional or not, influences the human experience. Many people live and work in places that impede or reduce physical activity and sell or promote unhealthy food. The National … Read more

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SA! Change 2017 Active Living Summit

Latino Health Active Living

United States

Are you interested in changing people’s health outcomes through programs, policy changes, and infrastructure improvements? Check out the inaugural Active Living Summit hosted by Movement Makers in Richmond, VA, May 17-19, 2017. We will be to there learn and present! Hear stories about policies changed, advocacy wins, innovative school initiatives, and more. Discover how to … Read more

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SA! Resource Physical Activity, Not Body Mass Index, Predicts Less Disability Before and After Stroke

Latino health walking physical activity

Stroke is the most frequent cause of adult-onset disability in the US. Sadly, there are disparities in average age for stroke, meaning some populations are at an increased risk at a younger age and some populations live with the physical, emotional, and financial burdens at a younger age. For example, the average age for stroke in Latinos … Read more

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SA! Resource New Rankings Show Healthiest & Least Healthy Counties in Texas

It is a well-known fact: where you live impacts your overall well-being. Environment greatly impacts health, education, employment, access to opportunity, and long-term success. Latinos often face inequities and disparities due to barriers created by their environments. Many have to live in low-income and high-poverty and high-crime neighborhoods with little access to healthy food and … Read more

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SA! Resource How Can Businesses Impact the Obesity Problem?

Childhood obesity is a serious public health concern in the United States. About 12.7 million children and adolescents aged 2–19 years, or 17 percent of the population, have obesity. For minorities, the statistics are even more troubling. Nearly 40% of Latino children are overweight or obese (higher rates than both white and black children), placing … Read more

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SA! Resource Report: Wolf Whistles and Creepy Compliments

Latino health walking safety

By the time many girls reach middle school, suggestive comments – along with unwanted touches, demands for smiles from strangers, and other forms of harassment – become a common experience in public places, according to a new report from the Safe Routes to School National Partnership (SRTS). Street harassment is a major barrier for kids and … Read more

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SA! Change Joint Call to Action to Promote Healthy Communities

Latino health walking community active living design safe routes complete streets

United States

The way our communities are designed and built can either support or hinder health. This includes sidewalks, bike lanes, public transportation, housing, schools, parks, employment centers, etc. Everyone deserves healthy communities with safe routes to where we live, learn, work, play, and pray, as well as safe routes to healthy food. The American Public Health Association (APHA) … Read more

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SA! Change Los Amigos Elementary Bike Train to School

Latino health walking school bus physical activity bike

Pima County, Arizona

Elementary schools across Pima County, Arizona (36.4% Latino), like Los Amigos Technology Academy, are encouraging a culture of health and physical activity through walking school buses. In their first year as a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) focus school, Los Amigos teachers and parents developed a Fitness Friday initiative with a bike train and five walking routes … Read more

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SA! Change San Antonio Seeking Student Ambassadors for 2017-2018

Latino Health Student Ambassador School MFC

Bexar County, Texas

The San Antonio Mayor’s Fitness Council (MFC) Student Ambassador Program is looking for the next group of kids to make their school or community healthier. Not only does San Antonio face high rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, but residents face disparities in chronic disease by income, education, and racial and ethnic groups. For example 15% of … Read more

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SA! Resource What is the Happiest/Healthiest State in the U.S.?

Where you live has an incredible amount to do with how healthy, happy, and often times, successful you are. Many Latino and low-income families lack access to healthy food options, safe streets to walk, health care facilities, and physical activity areas. All of these combine to impact an area’s culture of health. Recently, Gallup surveyed … Read more

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SA! Resource Taking Back the Streets and Sidewalks: How Safe Routes to School and Community Safety Initiatives Can Overcome Violence and Crime

Latino Health Walking Safety Crime and Violence prevention

Crime, violence and the fear of violence lead to reduced physical activity and loss of motivation to invest in health. According to a report from Safe Routes to School National Partnership (SRTS), 23% of Latino parents reported their neighborhoods were unsafe, compared with 8% of white parents. It is critical to address crime and violence for Latinas because … Read more

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SA! Resource Silent Barriers to Biking in Communities of Color

Latino Health bike bicycle biking walking pedestrian justice barriers

“Transportation professionals should be more concerned about the personal safety of Black and Hispanic cyclists because they are in a position to change how the built environment either acts as a conduit or barrier to criminal activity,” Charles T. Brown, a transportation researcher and adjunct professor of planning and public policy at Rutgers University, wrote in … Read more

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Public Hub Hub Tree: Salud America!

Salud America! is a national online network of researchers, community group leaders, decision-makers, and members of the public working together to support healthy policy and environmental changes that can help reverse obesity among Latino children.

The network, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is a project of the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Policies, comments, external links, and contributed stories and images are not affiliated with Salud America!, RWJF, or The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, nor do they necessarily reflect the views of or endorsement by these organizations.

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