weight of the nation

ReshapingTexas Website Launches

More than 1 in 5 Texas children aged 10 to 17 are obese, and obesity puts millions of Texans at risk for chronic disease. In response to the state’s obesity epidemic, Texas Comptroller Susan Combs has announced the launch of ReshapingTexas, a new online resource that examines the economic impacts of obesity and identifies areas in the state where children are at risk. read more

Barb Parnell: Bulging waistlines are growing and costly problem

Last week, a report titled “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future” issued by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health warned that the number of obese adults, along with related disease rates and health care costs, are on course to increase dramatically in every part of the country. While once again Colorado tops the list as the “leanest state” of adults, more than 20 percent of adults in Colorado are obese. Surprisingly, our children in Colorado have moved from third to 23rd “leanest” in the U.S. More…

Billionaires Fund A ‘Manhattan Project’ For Nutrition And Obesity

Why would a billionaire energy trader-turned-philanthropist throw his foundation’s dough behind a new think tank that wants to challenge scientific assumptions about obesity?

John Arnold, 38, whose move from Enron to a spectacularly successful hedge fund got him on the list of wealthiest Americans, isn’t crazy about talking to the press. But certainly his decision with his wife Laura to back a newly launched operation called the Nutrition Science Initiative, or NuSI, is an intriguing one. More…

Report: Obesity Rates Will Continue To Grow, Health Care Costs Will Follow

he Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health concluded that, based on current trends, most Americans could be obese by 2030.

Politico: Study: Obesity Rate To Jump By 50% By 2030
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Trust for America’s Health released a new report Tuesday projecting America’s obesity rates through 2030. If current obesity rates continue, every state could have an obesity rate above 44 percent by 2030, and most states could have rates higher than 50 percent, the report found (Smith, 9/19). More…

Mobile Camps Bring Summer Fun to Low-Income Communities

As summer stretches on and the euphoria of “no more teachers,” fades, parents everywhere face a similar dilemma: How do you keep your kids busy and out of trouble?

The answer for families with disposable income is often summer camps, which are getting more expensive every year. But that is not an option for low-income parents, some who might not even be able to afford the fees of community recreation programs and can’t get to a safe park.  More…

Nutritionists, health activists say better behavior is more effective in weight loss than playing the blame game nutritionists health activists say better behavior is more effective in weight loss than playing the blame game

The United States is well into its fourth decade of the “obesity epidemic,” and no matter how loudly we repeat the refrain “eat less and exercise more,” the numbers on our collective scale keep creeping upward.

Is weight gain caused by individuals’ poor diet and lack of exercise? Or is it an unavoidable effect of an abundant food supply, out-of-control marketing and unlucky genetics? And if most of the evidence points to the latter, why do government agencies continue to use tax dollars to promote solutions that have no hope of working?

In May, HBO aired “Weight of the Nation,” a miniseries produced with the Institute of Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institutes of Health. The four-part series made an impassioned case for the dangers of overweight and obesity, and the need to act now before it is too late for a generation of Americans.

The campaign was intended to start a national discussion about weight and health, but the responses have been mixed, as many nutritionists and public health activists have called the miniseries out for its “fat-shaming” rhetoric and emphasis on individual responsibility.  More…

Chronic Disease Prevention: Saving Lives, Saving Money

With a continued focus on the need to control the high and rising cost of care, Congress is looking for low cost, high yield policy solutions. Chronic illnesses are among the biggest drivers of growing health care costs, and a drain on worker productivity in our nation. For example, researchers note that per person health care spending for obese adults is 56 percent higher than for normal-weight adults. Diabetes and other chronic illnesses can be prevented or greatly delayed with solutions beyond or outside of medical care. Many fall into the category of health-related behaviors, such as whether we smoke, get exercise, eat a healthy diet– factors that are newly falling into the spheres of public health or population health. More…

Join The Root, Experts to Talk Black Obesity

(The Root) — It’s a very hot summer in the nation’s capital, butThe Root’s focus on weight loss and fitness this month has nothing to do with the fact that it’s beach season. Our Black, Fit, & Healthy Series is about something more serious than dropping pounds for vanity’s sake: It’s a commitment to understand and tackle the African-American obesity crisis, its complex causes and its implications for the health of our community.  More…

Obesity forces new view of soda pop

Recent indicators that America’s expanding waistline is threatening to become a permanent epidemic have intensified calls for the nation to lay off sugary beverages.

More than one-third of U.S. adults — 35.7% — are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As obesity rates rise, some are pointing their fingers at the beverage industry, whose high-calorie drinks, critics say, contribute to tooth decay, diabetes and heart disease.  More…

It’s time to confront America’s obesity epidemic

OK friends, its time for a serious discussion on a heavy topic: our weight. We are in denial by simply calling obesity an issue; frankly, it is among the most pressing health issues we face in the United States.

Two-thirds of adults in our nation are overweight or obese, as are one-third of our children. Being overweight causes life-long chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, strokes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Obesity has an economic impact on our nation as well; an estimated $147 billion is spent on obesity-related medical costs each year.  More…

Obesity: Society has to fight back

The Walt Disney Co. last week announced plans to restrict junk food commercials on its television programmes aimed at children. A few days earlier, mayor Michael Bloomberg took steps to restrict the sale of supersized sugary drinks in New York. But isolated changes may not make a substantial difference at a time when Americans are gaining weight as a nation. Reducing obesity will require a broader shift in culture. More…