robert wood johnson foundation

ALBD: Ten Years of Publications

Join Community Commons in congratulating Active Living By Design on their ten years of pioneering work in active living and healthy eating. Over the course of several weeks, the Commons will highlight ALBD’s commemorative milestones in a series of Features.

Inspiring stories drive advocacy work, but it is research and data that ultimately proves whether a strategy is a success or still a work in progress. ALBD features the following noteworthy publications that provide evidence-based, successful approaches to improve health in communities. Read more

ALBD: Ten Years of Lessons Learned

Join Community Commons in congratulating Active Living By Design on their ten years of pioneering work in active living and healthy eating. Over the course of several weeks, the Commons will highlight ALBD’s commemorative milestones in a series of Features.

Pioneering projects don’t come with a guidebook; it is written along the way so that others may have an easier path. ALBD offers these lessons learned to help clear the way for continued work. Read more

ALBD: Reflections from Grantees

Join Community Commons in congratulating Active Living By Design on their ten years of pioneering work in active living and healthy eating. Over the course of several weeks, the Commons will highlight ALBD’s commemorative milestones in a series of Features.

“Great things are done by a series of smaller things brought together.”-van Gogh. Building a culture of active living and healthy eating begins with community-led change that grows and spreads to all facets of life. Local grantees look back at their relationship with ALBD and how it helped them turn their small deeds into great things. Read more

ALBD: Ten Years of Partnerships

Join Community Commons in congratulating Active Living By Design on their ten years of pioneering work in active living and healthy eating. Over the next several weeks, the Commons will highlight ALBD’s commemorative milestones in a series of Features.

It takes a village to create community change. Active Living By Design is fortunate to have had an wide array of villagers take up the cause of making the healthy choice the easy choice. The graphic below, followed by reflections from individual partners, celebrates what working together can do for the common good. Read more

ALBD: Ten Years of Reflections

Join Community Commons in congratulating Active Living By Design on their ten years of pioneering work in active living and healthy eating. Over the next several weeks, the Commons will highlight ALBD’s commemorative milestones in a series of Features.

Reflection allows us to create meaning and transfer learning to new context. Images reflected through a camera lens, combined with words of reflection by ALBD staff, paint a vivid picture of the impact this movement has, and will continue to have, on creating healthy communities. Read more

ALBD: Stories from Community Partners

Join Community Commons in congratulating Active Living By Design on their ten years of pioneering work in active living and healthy eating. Over the next several weeks, the Commons will highlight ALBD’s commemorative milestones in a series of Features.

In what ALBD Director Sarah Strunk calls the “high touch/low dollar” approach to grant making, twenty-five diverse community partnerships were chosen (out of 966 who applied) in 2003 to see what they could do with a steady stream of modest funding matched with high-level technical assistance over the course of five years. Read more

ALBD: Ten Years of Pioneering Work

Active Living By Design (ALBD), part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation initiative Active Living Programs, was a pioneer project when it was founded in 2002. “The focus was on increasing physical activity through changes in policy and the built environment,” said ALBD Director Sarah Strunk, “A significant departure from the more traditional focus on education and awareness as primary influencers of behavior change.” Read more

Udall: Investing in Americans’ health

Colorado is home to some of the fittest Americans in the country, but like most of our nation, we are facing a growing problem: ourselves.

According to a recent study from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, one-fifth of Coloradans are obese. And the study projects that nearly 45 percent of Coloradans will be obese by 2030. If the projected trend continues, more and more Americans will live with chronic diseases related to obesity, including heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Moreover, medical costs associated with treating those preventable diseases would be estimated to increase by $48 billion to $66 billion per year in the United States.

Read more:Udall: Investing in Americans’ health – The Denver Posthttp://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_21701345/investing-americans-health#ixzz28jHvJXsu
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Barb Parnell: Bulging waistlines are growing and costly problem

Last week, a report titled “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future” issued by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health warned that the number of obese adults, along with related disease rates and health care costs, are on course to increase dramatically in every part of the country. While once again Colorado tops the list as the “leanest state” of adults, more than 20 percent of adults in Colorado are obese. Surprisingly, our children in Colorado have moved from third to 23rd “leanest” in the U.S. More…

Patient-Generated Mobile Data Improves Clinical Care

Studies show that patients who log their thoughts and behaviors–“observations of daily living”–via mobile apps or sensors so docs can monitor them between visits get better care.

Using mobile devices to report “observations of daily living” (ODLs) can help improve healthcare, according to studies supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).The five research teams involved in RWJF’s Project HealthDesign found that when patients used technologies such as smartphone apps, sensors, iPods, and iPads to collect information from their daily lives and share it with providers, clinical care improved. Moreover, they found that providers were willing to use the data if it was properly filtered and presented. More..

Motivational gaming gets more middle-schoolers to exercise, study shows

Getting people to embrace motivational gaming for health and fitness may be a struggle, but some new data suggest that the concept works well when used properly.

Results of a study presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the Obesity Society in San Antonio, Texas, found that 59 percent of adolescents using Zamzee, an activity meter that resembles a USB drive, had higher levels of physical activity during a six-month test when they had access to a motivational website than those who did not.  Exercise prompted by extra motivation helped reduce risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to the study, sponsored the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Zamzee developer HopeLab, Redwood City, Calif. More…